Thursday, February 26, 2009

Efrem "Prospero" Zimbalist, Jr.?

The Tempest. Dir. William Woodman. Perf. Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., William Hootkins, and Duane Black. 1983. Videocassette. Century Home Video, 1983.
While we're in a tempestuous frame of mind, we might consider the performance of Prospero that Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. gave us. The name itself is quite weighty. It sounds like a big-time, old-school studio executive with a cigar to match his temper and an ego bigger than both put together.

The performance is not quite as weighty as that sounds, but it is better than what you might expect from a big-time, old-school studio executive with a cigar to match his temper and an ego bigger than both put together.

[Note: Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. was not a big-time, old-school studio executive with a cigar to match his temper and an ego bigger than both put together. Neither was Efrem Zimbalist, Sr. The later (who was the former, chronologically speaking) was an extremely famous concert violinist; the fomer (who came later) made his big break as Dandy Jim Buckley in Maverick in the 1950s.]

In any case, you can see for yourself and judge for yourself by watching the following clip:

video

Links: The Film at IMDB.

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2 comments:

Pretentious Wombat said...

Just one thing - the proofreader in me would really like it if you changed the title of this posting to correctly spell "Prospero" - please?

kj said...

I was too busy trying to spell Efrem Zimbalist right every time, and I overlooked the spelling of Prospero as a result!

Thanks for the spellcheck!

kj

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Shakespeare, William. The Riverside Shakespeare. 2nd ed. Gen. ed. G. Blakemore Evans. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.
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