Thursday, March 28, 2013

A Great App—and a Tempest Giveaway

Morin, Duane. Shakeshare: Sharable Shakespeare. Apple App. 28 March 2013.

Shakespeare Geek, author of the Oldest Shakespeare Blog on the Internet, has developed an amazing and amusing app for the iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, et cetera.

The app provides an enormous array of quotes and images and allows users to e-mail, tweet, or save them.  The quotes come in two sorts: quotations from Shakespeare (see an example below) and jokes related to Shakespeare (see an example above and to the right).  It's astonishing.  The creativity that combines quotes from Shakespeare with playful Shakespeare-related jokes is very fun—but the images behind those quotes raise it to an unmatchable level.  You can even use your own images with the fun quotations, sending them to your fellow Shakespeare fans.

Moreover, Shakespeare Geek is running a competition right now until March 31.  The details are here, and you could win a copy of Julie Taymor's Tempest.

Download the app for its own sake, but enter the competition, too.  Enjoy!


Links: The App at iTunes.

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Bardfilm is normally written as one word, though it can also be found under a search for "Bard Film Blog." Bardfilm is a Shakespeare blog (admittedly, one of many Shakespeare blogs), and it is dedicated to commentary on films (Shakespeare movies, The Shakespeare Movie, Shakespeare on television, Shakespeare at the cinema), plays, and other matter related to Shakespeare (allusions to Shakespeare in pop culture, quotes from Shakespeare in popular culture, quotations that come from Shakespeare, et cetera).

Unless otherwise indicated, quotations from Shakespeare's works are from the following edition:
Shakespeare, William. The Riverside Shakespeare. 2nd ed. Gen. ed. G. Blakemore Evans. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.
All material original to this blog is copyrighted: Copyright 2008-2016 (and into perpetuity thereafter) by Keith Jones.

The very instant that I saw you did / My heart fly to your service; there resides, / To make me slave to it; and, for your sake, / Am I this patient [b]log-man.

—The Tempest