Friday, May 30, 2008

Twin Cities Park-Bound Shakespeare



Love’s Labor’s Lost. Dir. Derek Washington. Perf. Erin Busby, Paul Brutcher, Erin Caswell, and Erika Danielle Crane. Cromulent Shakespeare Company. St. Paul, Minnesota. 6-28 June 2008.
You peasant swain! you whoreson malt-horse drudge!
Did I not bid thee meet me in the park,
And bring along these rascal knaves with thee? (The Taming of the Shrew, IV.i.129-31)
This year, the Cromulent Shakespeare Company is presenting Love’s Labor’s Lost in various parks in the Twin Cities. I think that it will be well worth a trip, especially because there is no cost!

Leaving apart, of course, the cost of trying to follow the tightly-constructed, university-wit-parodying, dizzyingly-rapid language of the play!

The first show is in Kenwood part one week from today: on Friday, June 6 at 7:00 p.m.

For families, there’s a performance at Como Park at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, June 15.

Let’s hope it’s a good one! But, stellar or not-quite-so-stellar, it’s free and it’s in the park.

Enjoy!

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Bardfilm is normally written as one word, though it can also be found under a search for "Bard Film Blog." Bardfilm is a Shakespeare blog (admittedly, one of many Shakespeare blogs), and it is dedicated to commentary on films (Shakespeare movies, The Shakespeare Movie, Shakespeare on television, Shakespeare at the cinema), plays, and other matter related to Shakespeare (allusions to Shakespeare in pop culture, quotes from Shakespeare in popular culture, quotations that come from Shakespeare, et cetera).

Unless otherwise indicated, quotations from Shakespeare's works are from the following edition:
Shakespeare, William. The Riverside Shakespeare. 2nd ed. Gen. ed. G. Blakemore Evans. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.
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